States

States

Each state became a part of the United States at different times. Below are two different videos on the creation of the United States.

Short version

Longer and more detailed version

They began taking Federal Census records at different times because they joined the United States at different times. Some of those records have been lost. All that exist can be found online from 1790 to  1940. The 1950 Federal census will become a public record in April 2022. There is a 72 waiting period for these records to become public records.

Many of these states also took their own state censuses. The review of these state censuses is being posted on Facebook and Instagram during 2020. Shortly after they are posted, they will be added to this page.

Alabama

Post 1: Federal censuses available for Alabama exist from 1830 to 1940. The next few posts will show the state censuses that are available for Alabama online.

Post 2: The United States Census Bureau states that Alabama has state censuses for 1818, 1820, 1821, 1823, 1850, 1855, 1866 and 1907. The state census records that I could find online were 1820, 1850, 1855 and 1866. The following posts will give more detail about these state census records.

For Family Search: Go to the top menu. Click on “Search” and then choose “Records” from the drop down menu. Under the map type in “State Census” in the box. Alabama will come up with 1855 and 1866.

For Ancestry: Go to the top menu. Click on “Search” and then go to the Card Catalog. Under Title type “Alabama”. Under Keyword(s) type “State Census.

Post 3: The Alabama 1820 state census gives only a little information and covers a few counties.

Post 4: Alabama did a state census as well as a federal census in 1850. The Alabama 1850 state census gives about the same information as the 1820 census.

Post 5: Alabama did another state census in 1855 but did not cover as many counties as they did in 1850.

Post 6: The Alabama 1866 state census collected information from many counties, but they didn’t ask for much information.

Alaska

Post 1: Alaska was a territory of the United States so the US took census of the territory before it became a state.

Post 2: Only a few census records were collected between 1870 and 1907. They were not collected each year. The information found online is available through Ancestry.com. From the top menu choose, “Search” and then “Card Catalog”. Type in Alaska census. You then need to type in the name of your ancestor to see the information.
Post 3: The census records contain just the person’s name and were done mostly for St Paul and St. George Islands.

Arizona

Post 1: Arizona was a territory before it became a state, but the federal government started taking collecting census information in 1870 for Arizona.

Post 2: Arizona state census information for 1864, 1866, 1876 and 1882 can be found on Ancestry.com. On the main menu type in “Search” and the “Card Catalog”. Type in Arizona census. The first result is Arizona, Territorial Census Records, 1864-1882. There is a Navajo County census for 1910, and a complied census index for 1831-1880 that can also be searched.

Post 3: The information collected in 1864 gives name, age, sex, birth, naturalization information. If the person was married, it asked where the family was living.

Post 4: The 1866 and 1876 census only asks for a person’s name and where they lived.

Post 5: The 1882 census gives a person’s name, their age and place of birth.

Arkansas

Post 1: Federal census records for Arkansas began as early as 1830. These records can be found online through Family Search by using the top menu, “Search” then “Catalog” then “Census”. The records can also be found on Ancestry.com. Use “Search” to “Census & Voters Lists”. On the right side of the page choose “U.S. Federal Census Collections” then go to the bottom of the page and choose the years you would like to search. You can also search by state and then county on the right side of the page.

Post 2: https://www.census.gov/…/other_resources/state_censuses.html gives the state census dates as 1823, 1829, 1865, and 1911. Family Search has the 1823, 1829 and 1911 censuses in book form, but it is not online. Under the catalog type in Arkansas, United States and then look under census.

Ancestry.com has a compiled census that has different years between 1819 and 1870 in which the 1823 and 1829 Sheriff’s censuses can be found but not the 1865. New Horizons Genealogy http://www.newhorizonsgenealogicalservices.com/ar-census.htm states, “An Arkansas state census was conducted for 1865, but exists for Washington County only.” Check out their website to find more online state census substitutes. It was hard to find information on the non-federal censuses or taxes taken.

California

Post 1: The 1850 census does not have the counties of Contra Costa, San Francisco and Santa Clara. This makes the 1852 state census more valuable if you have relatives living in California during that time period.

Family Search has all the Federal Censuses online. Go to Search – Card Catalog – Census to find the records.

Post 2: Family Search has only the 1852 census online. Go to Search in the top menu. Then type in California State Census and the 1852 census will come up.

According to US Census Bureau California had nine state censuses done; 1788, 1790, 1796, 1797-98, 1816, 1836, 1844, 1852. https://www.census.gov/…/other_resources/state_censuses.html

Ancestry also has the 1852 California state census. Under the Card Catalog search for California State Census, 1852. Ancestry has voting records. Under the Card Catalog search for California, Voter Registers, 1866-1898.

Post 3: The 1852 California state census asked for the name of all persons in the household, age, sex, color (race), occupation, birthplace and their last residence.

Colorado

Post 1: Family Search and Ancestry have 1870 to 1940 Colorado state census records online.

Post 2: Both Family Search and Ancestry provide the 1885 census online.

Post 3: The 1885 Colorado state census asks for the address, name of each person in the household, color (race), sex, age (if born in the previous year, it asks for the month), occupation, health questions, education and the birthplace of self and parents.

Connecticut

Post 1: Connecticut census records on Family Search can be found by choosing, “Search” on the top menu. Then choose, “Catalog”. Type in “Connecticut”. Choose the census year you would like. If you only want records that are online, click on “Online” on the left side and then update. Notice that 1810 through 1840 are not available online.

Connecticut census records on Ancestry can be found by clicking on “Search” and then clicking on “Census & Voter Lists” on the drop down. You can narrow your search by clicking on “U.S. federal Census Collection” on the right side. Then scroll down and choose the year you would like to search. Notice on the right side that you can choose Connecticut and then the county if you would like to search through the actual records.

Post 2: Connecticut did not take any state censuses. Searching for tax or records, or directories is an alternative.

Delaware

Post 1:  Delaware was the first state to ratify the constitution and did so on the 7th December 1787. Federal census for Delaware are currently available from 1800 to 1940.

Post 2: On the United States Census Bureau it lists 1782 as a state census. https://www.census.gov/…/other_resources/state_censuses.html In the Family Search catalog it states, “ Delaware 1782 tax assessment and census lists — Index to volumes 1-10 of the Delaware Genealogical Society journal. This index is available to be viewed at LDS Family History Centers. https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/1392068…

Post 3:

District of Columbia

Post 1:  District of Columbia (DC) is not a state, but a federal census was taken for this city beginning in 1800. Part of DC can also be found in the 1890 census.

Florida

Post 1: Family Search has all the census online except 1840 census. Ancestry.com does have the Florida Territory census.

Post 2: The United States Census Bureau list the following state censuses for Florida: 1825, 1855, 1866, 1867, 1868, 1875, 1885, 1895, 1935, and 1945. The online records that I could find were 1867, 1875, 1885, 1945 and 1935.

Family Search: Search~Records~Find a Collection. Type in Florida State Census. They have 1885, 1935 and 1945 online.

Ancestry: Search~Catalog. Type in Title: Florida; Keyword(s): State Census. The have a database with the records from 1867 to 1945, but 1895 is not included. Another database is just for 1885.

Post 3: Ancestry has this census in a database listed for Florida, State Census, 1867-1945. Use the catalog to find this database. On the right side there is a section that says, “Browse this collection”. You can choose 1867 and chose a specific county to search. You can also just choose to search by the name and see if they come up in the 1867 census.

Post 4: Ancestry has this census in a database listed for Florida, State Census, 1867-1945. Use the catalog to find this database. On the right side there is a section that says, “Browse this collection”. You can choose 1875 and chose a specific county to search. You can also just choose to search by the name and see if they come up in the 1875 census.

Post 5: Both Ancestry and Family Search have a database just for the 1885

Florida

Post 6: The 1935 Florida census can be found on both Family Search and Ancestry.

Family Search: Search>Records>Find a Collection. Type in Florida State Census and chose the 1935 database.

Ancestry: Search>Catalog>Title:Florida>Keyword:State Census.

Post 7: The 1945 Florida census can be found on both Family Search and Ancestry.

Family Search: Search~Records~Find a Collection. Type in Florida State Census and chose the 1945 database.

Ancestry: Search~Catalog~Title:Florida~Keyword:State Census

Georgia

Post 1:  Georgia was the 4th state.

Post 2: The United States Census Bureau gives the following dates for state censuses: 1798, 1800, 1810, 1827, 1834, 1838, 1845, 1852, 1853, 1859, 1865, 1879.

Family Search has the 1896 Census for Atlantic City 1896 with the following information: Name, Address, Age, Sex, Race and Nativity.
It also provides the 1790, 1827, 1835, 1845, 1864. 1835 are the Cherokee census records and they are available online in a book form.

Ancestry has a compiled Census and substitute indexes, 1790-1890.

Post 3: The United States Census Bureau gives the following dates for state censuses: 1798, 1800, 1810, 1827, 1834, 1838, 1845, 1852, 1853, 1859, 1865, 1879.

Family Search has the 1896 Census for Atlantic City 1896 with the following information: Name, Address, Age, Sex, Race and Nativity.
It also provides the 1790, 1827, 1835, 1845, 1864. 1835 are the Cherokee census records and they are available online in a book form.

Ancestry has a compiled Census and substitute indexes, 1790-1890.

Hawaii

Post 1: Hawaii became the 50th State

Post 2: The US Census Bureau gives the dates of 1878, 1890 and 1896 for state census records in Hawaii.

Family Search: Records are available online, but it is hard to find them. FS Film Census filed, 1847-1896 # 007903271; You need to click on the little camera. This record is mixed with many other records. There is no index for this film. Image 158 is Oahu 1849 and image 307 was 1866 Island of Hawaii. Some records were recorded in Hawaiian so it was difficult for me to read.

Idaho

Post 1: Notice that there were two censuses taken before Idaho became a state and the 1890 census does not exist for Idaho.

Post 2: Idaho did not take any state censuses. Searching for directories, land records and church records is another option to find relatives between the federal census records.

Illinois

Post 1:  Illinois became the 21st State.

Post 2: US Census Bureau gives the following years for state censuses; g. 1810, 1818, 1820, 1825, 1830, 1835, 1840, 1845, 1855, 1865. I could not find anything before 1825 online.

Post 3: 1825 Illinois state census: Only for the counties of Edwards, Fulton, and Randolph; Head of Household; Free white males 21 and up and 21 and under; Free white females; Servants and Slaves Male and Female; Free persons of color; male and female; Manufactories.

Post 4: Illinois 1835 state census: Fayette, Fulton, Jasper, and Morgan; Head of Household, 0-10 10-20 to 90 over; male and female; colored free males and females; Indentured; stone mill, water mill, ? hose mill.

Post 5: Illinois 1845 state census: Cass, Putnam and Tazewell; All people with age written under one of the columns; 16, 26,36, 46,56,66,76,86,96,100;

Post 6: Illinois 1855 state census: Name of Head of Household, age ranges 0-10; 10-20, 20-30,30-40;40-50; + up to over 90. Each range is divided by the number of males and females; # of free persons of color; Militia; Manufacturies of all kinds (no answer); Agricultural Questions; Educational Questions

Illinois 1865 state census: Name of Head of Household, age ranges 0-10; 10-20, 20-30,30-40;40-50; + up to over 100. Each range is divided by the number of males and females; # of free persons of color; # of Manufactures and annual production (no answer); # of Coal Mines; Value of Live Stock, Value of Grain Production, Value of Agricultural Products; # of Pounds of Wool; Educational Questions.

Indiana

Post 1: Indiana became the 19th State.

Post 2:

US Census Bureau lists the following state census records: 1807, 1853, 1857, 1871, 1877, 1883, 1889, 1901, 1913, 1919, 1931. Most of these I could not find. Below are a few links that give links to some of the years and the counties where the enumeration took place.

Iowa

Post 1: Iowa became the 29th State.

Post 2: Iowa was really good at taking state censuses. You are lucky if you have a relative that lived in Iowa. See what you can find about your relatives in these records.

Post 3: These were found these on Ancestry.com. Use the card catalog and type in Iowa State Census.

Post 4: These were found these on Ancestry.com. Use the card catalog and type in Iowa State Census.

Post 5: These were found these on Ancestry.com. Use the card catalog and type in Iowa State Census.

Post 6: These were found  in the 1856 Iowa state census records on Ancestry.com. Use the card catalog and type in Iowa State Census. A lot of information can be found on these records.

Post 7: 1885 indexed Name of each person, Township, Range, Section, Street and number or other accurate designation, if in town plat. Age, sex, color, Marital status, Occupation, Place of birth each person, Parents list N for Native, F if Foreign, subject to military duty, Entitled to vote, Alien who has taken out first papers, Cannot read or write, over 10 years old, Deaf and dumb, blind, insane or idiotic.

Post 8: This is another wonderful state census especially since there is no 1890 census.

1895: Name, Age, Sex, Race, Marital Status, Birthplace and residence, Parents are Native or Foreign born, Occupation, Religious belief, Military, Health, Education
1. Family Search: You can view the actual records.
2. Ancestry: Just gives indexed information. You cannot see the records.

Post 9:

1905: Indexed in a vertical format Name, PO Box address, Sex (can read or write), Color, Age, Place of birth self, mother, father, own home yes or no, Value of house or farm, naturalized yes or no, years in us, Years in Iowa, marital status, education, occupation, military service. Religious denomination is given for each family.
      1. Family Search: Use the card catalog. Type in United States, Iowa. Click on online. Go to the 1905 census and go down the page result to find the county you want to search. There is a page for each individual and they are listed in alphabetical order for each county.
     2. Ancestry: Use the card catalog. Type in Iowa State Census. Click on 1905 and it will take you to a database for multiple census years. On the right side you can choose 1905 and then the county. The results are just an index list of people for each county.

Post 10: In 1915, the census is found in a card format in both Family Search and Ancestry: Name, age, County, Town(ship) ward, Occupation, Months in 194 unemployed, Total earnings for 1914 from occupation, Education, Birth place, do you own your home or farm; Incumbrance on farm or home, Value of farm or home, Military Service, Church Affiliation, Father and Mother’s birthplace, sex, color, marital status, Blind, Deaf, Insane, Idiot, If foreign born are you Naturalize, Years in US Years in Iowa.

Post 11: The 1925 census gives the following information. Name of each person, Relationship to Head of Family, sex, color or race, age at las birthday, marital status, If owned, Free or Mortgaged, Value of this home, Amt of Mortgage, If rented amt of rent monthly, if owned amt of all insurance carried on this home, If foreign born are you naturalized, no years in US, No years in IA, Education, Place of birth, Name of Father and his birthplace, Age last Birthday, Full Maiden name of Mother and her place of birth age of last birthday, Place of marriage of Parents of Person enumerated, Military, Occupation, Church.

Kansas

Post 1: Kansas was the 34th state. The first federal census was in 1860. There are many state census with lots of information.

Post 2: As you can see there are many Kansas state censuses. What can be found on each of them will be on the following posts.

Post 3: The 1855 Kansas state census can be found through the card catalog on Family Search. It is in a book format. On Ancestry, it is part of the state census collection. Use the card catalog and type in Kansas state census.

Information that can be found: Name of all people, occupation, age, sex, where from, citizenship (native, naturalized, declarants), Negroes, slaves, voters.

Post 4: These records were really voting records so give just names of people who voted. Not all counties are in the collection. This can be found on Ancestry.com in their Kansas state census collection.

Post 5: The information is Just like the federal 1860 census; Dwelling House, Family No, Name, Age, Sex, Color, Regiment, Company, Occupation, Estate (Real and Personal), Birth, Marital Status, Education, Cannot read or write over age 20, Health (Deaf, dumb, blind, insane, idiotic, pauper or convict.

Post 6: The 1875 Kansas State Census is similar to the 1870 Federal Census. The information that can be found is Dwelling, Family number, Names of every person, age, sex, race, occupation Real Estate Real and Personal, Birthplace, where from to KS, education, (broken down by age). It can be found on Family Search and Ancestry.com.

Post 7: The information that can be found is Dwelling, Family #, Name of every person, age, sex, color, marital status, occupation, Place of birth, where from to KS, Education broken down by age.military 6 questions. This can be found on Family Search and Ancestry.com

Post 8: This census and the 1885 census are wonderful substitutes for the lost 1890 census. The information that can be found in the 1895 census is Dwelling, F #, Name of every person, age, sex, color, birthplace, from where to KS, Occupation, education broken up by age, six questions about military. This can be found on Family Search and Ancestry.com.

Post 9: The 1905 census contains the following information: Owned or rented, owned free or mortgaged, farm or house, dwelling #, family #, Name of every person, age, sex, color, birthplace, Where from to KS, occupation, education, 6 questions about military. This can be found on Family Search and Ancestry.com.

Post 10: The 1915 Kansas State Census contains the following information: Owned or rented, owned free or mortgaged, farm or house, dwelling #, family #, Name of every person, age, sex, color, birthplace, Where from to KS, occupation, education, six military questions. It also asks if they had a home library with 10 or more books.

Post 11: The 1925 Kansas State Census contains the following information: Owned or rented, owned free or mortgaged, farm or house, dwelling #, family #, Name of every person, age, sex, color, birthplace, Where from to KS, occupation, education, and citizenship questions.

Kentucky

Post 1: Kentucky became the 15th State.

Post 2: I have a lot of relatives from Kentucky. Kentucky has no state census records, but I have found that many of the records like probate and tax records are available online and can be read at home and don’t have to be viewed from a family history center.

Louisiana

Post 1: Louisiana was the 18th State. Louisiana was part of the Louisiana purchase.

Post 2: Louisiana has no state censuses.

Maine

Post 1: Maine was the 23rd State.

Post 2: There were no state censuses taken, but in 1837 there was aSurplus Revenue Census taken. The next post will cover how to access this information.

Post 3: The information for 1837 Surplus Revenue Census can be found on Family Search. It is not indexed, but you can see the images. Search>Catalog; Type in United States, Maine; click on online only; Find United States, Maine; Census (3); Maine, surplus revenue census, 1837A; Name of head of household. Then it lists numbers in columns; Persons under 4 years of age; Persons 4 years and under 21 years of age; Persons 21 years of age and upwards; Total Or under 4; 4 under 21; 21 +; Total

Maryland

Post 1: Maryland became the 7th State.

Post 2:  This census taken before Maryland became a state.

Massachusetts

Post 1: Massachusetts became the 6th State.

Post 2:  Massachusetts took two state censuses; 1855 and 1865.

Post 3: The 1855 Massachusetts state census can be found on both Family Search and Ancestry.

This is what can be found on this census: Name of every person, age, sex, color, profession, birthplace, (deaf and dumb, blind, Insane, Idiotic, pauper or convict).

Post 4:The 1865 Massachusetts state census can be found on Family Search and Ancestry.

This is what can be found in the 1865 census: Name of every person, age, sex, color, birthplace, marital status, can read and write, Ratable Polls, Legal Voters, and naturalized voters

Michigan

Post 1: Michigan became the 26th State.

Post 2: Family Search has the book explaining about the 1904 census, but the enumeration information is not available. Family Search has a 1915 census listed. This is an Indian census roll. The information is not available online.

Post 3: Family Search 1894: Names all in the household, age, sex, color, relationship, marital status, married within the census year (June1 1893 to June 1 1894), number of children, number of children living, and birthplace of self and parents (on top section of page). Children born to the family during census year, occupation, military, health and school information, Time of residence within the state, number of years in the US, status if not living at home (on the bottom of the page).

Minnesota

Post 1: Minnesota became a state on the 11 May 1858.
Post 2: Minnesota had multiple state censuses. Various information can be found in the different years. In 1836 there is an Iowa census for Dubuque and Demoine that covers some areas that became part of the state of Minnesota. It is in a book format.
Post 3: The 1850 Minnesota Territory census that covers Itasco, Wahnahta and Mankahta coutnies. It is also in a book format. Information in this record contains the name of each person, their age, gender, occupation and birthplace.
Post 4: 1857 – Minnesota Terrtory contains the name of each person, age, gender, birthplace, native or naturalized voter and occupation.
Post 5: The 1865 state census contains the name of each person, gender or total males and females in household. Other heading, but nothing filled in: health  and, military questions: Soldier or Officer in service of US June 1, 1865.
Post 6: The 1875 state census contains the name of each person, age, gender, color, Nativity, State or Country, parent’s nativity.
Post 7: The 1885 census contains the name of each person, age, gender, color, birthplace, mark if parents are of foreign birth, and health questions.
Post 8: Minnesota 1895 state census as for the name of each person, age, sex, color, birthplace, how long a resident of state and enumeration district, occupation, if parents are foreign born.
Post 9: The Minnesota 1905 is the last state census for Minnesota. It asks for the name of each person, address, sex, age, color, place of birth for self and parents, residency, occupation, and military (Soldier or Sailor and War: Civil or Spanish).

Mississippi

Post 1: Mississippi became the 20th state on the 10 December 1817. It has Federal Censuses from 1820 to 1940.

Post 2:  Mississippi has many different state censuses but most of them are for just one or two counties. Each of them ask different questions, Many of them just ask the name of the head of household. Some of the other things you might find are birth, death, persons over age 70, age ranges for male and female, number of slaves, occupation, etc.

Ancestry has a searchable database, Use the catalog and type in Mississippi state census to view the database. Family Search does not offer these records online.

Missouri

Post 1: Missouri became the 24th state on the 10th of August 1821.

Post 2: Family Search offers a database with years from 1832 to 1933. You can search by name or browse all the records. Ancestry offers a database from 1844 to 1881.

Post 3: Various counties are found in the different years with various information asked for each of the different censuses. The 1876 census was the only year in which most all counties had state census taken.

Post 4: The 1876 state census is the only census that covers most of the counties. The questions asked are the name of every person, age, sex, race, health(deaf, dumb, blind, insane, Livestock; no horses, mules, jacks, Jennets, cattle, sheep, hogs, Products; Wheat, corn, oats, barley, rye, tobacco, wool, sugar, hay, Hemp, whisky, whine and molasses.

Montana

Post 1: Montana became the 41st State on the 8th of November 1889. They have Federal censuses from 1870 to 1940. The 1870 and 1880 census were for the territory.

Post 2: Montana did not take a state census.

Nebraska

Nevada

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New Mexico

New York

North Carolina

North Dakota

Ohio

Oklahoma

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

South Carolina

South Dakota

Tennessee

Texas

Utah

Vermont

Virginia

Washington

West Virginia

Wisconsin

Wyoming